Quite a few people think of wildland fires as natural disasters. It is true that some of them start because of dry conditions and unusual circumstances, such as a lightning strike at the exact wrong place and time.

However, research into wildland fires by the National Park Service makes it clear that these terrible events are often human in origin. Roughly 85% of wildland fires have causes attributed to human activity, such as unattended fires and other irresponsible behavior.

Determining who has fault or responsibility for a wildland fire is often the first step toward taking action to recoup the losses you suffered because of a wildland fire.

Your insurance may cover property damage but not other kinds of losses

When a wildland fire rips through your area, it can cause catastrophic damage to the land on which your home stands, as well as to the buildings in improvements on your property. A good insurance policy will likely protect you from financial losses if structures on your property wind up damaged.

Unfortunately, insurance typically won’t offer compensation for the impact that fire has on the usability or curb appeal of your real property. You may no longer be able to use the properties for all the same purposes you once did.

Additionally, when it comes time to sell, the damage to the property and the recent occurrence of a wildland fire may significantly reduce what people will offer for the purchase price of the property. Determining who has caused the fire can give you an opportunity to recoup those secondary losses from the person responsible for the fire that damaged your home or land.